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10 Best Southern Hemisphere Destinations Where It Will Soon Be Summer

10 Best Southern Hemisphere Destinations Where It Will Soon Be Summer


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This winter, travel to Earth’s warmer half

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Bali, Indonesia

Stunning temples, intimate beaches, and picturesque rice paddies are just a few reasons Bali is a desirable getaway destination. Since it’s located just below the equator, any time of year is a great time to visit.

Buenos Aires, Argentina

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Argentina’s summer months can get pretty hot — so pack light, breathable clothes — but it’s a popular time for travelers to visit to escape the colder climate of the Northern Hemisphere. Between December and March, you can find plenty of free summer events around the city, too.

Cape Town, South Africa

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There is an endless list of things to do on the South African coast, and Cape Town is a wonderful city for adventurers to visit during the summer. With the ocean on one side and Table Mountain on the other, you can split your time between diving with sharks and hiking the mountain.

Diani Beach, Kenya

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A Kenyan paradise, Diani Beach is a destination for travelers who just want some relaxation time by the beach. The white sand beaches stretch for miles with snorkeling, deep-sea fishing, and scuba diving being just some of the many water activities offered. The Shimba Hills National Reserve is also a short drive away if you want to see some magnificent elephants.

Easter Island, Chile

Easter Island, a serene and isolated island far off the mainland. Most famous for its monolithic statues — known as moai — and clear water, the island is a dream for photographers and adventurous travelers. It’s a small island, but there are plenty of climbing opportunities, as well as horseback riding and surfing.

Lima, Peru

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Lima is a bustling city with no shortage of entertainment and many historical sites to visit. You can take a culinary tour of the city (one of South America's best food towns), visit the Museo Larco's stunning collection of pre-Columbian art, or just lay out on the beach.

Male, Maldives

Though not quite in the Southern Hemisphere, the city of Male is close enough to the equator that summer weather can still be enjoyed. January through April is the best time of year for scuba diving in the Maldives, but snorkeling and sightseeing is also popular.

Queenstown, New Zealand

If you’re an outdoor adventurer who can’t sit still, Queenstown is a prime summer destination. From sky diving, to river surfing, to canyoning, Queenstown is perfect for adrenaline junkies.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Thinkstock

During the summer beaches can get crowded in Rio de Janeiro, but that shouldn’t discourage you from planning a trip there. The Corcovado Mountain, Tijuca Rain Forest, and city nightlife will keep you busy.

Sydney, Australia

Enjoy a culinary experience by the water, or wander off to a secret beach. Sydney is a great destination with something to offer to any traveller. The skyline, gardens, parks, art, surfing, and the many beaches are just a few reasons that make Sydney a popular destination.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.


Why there are almost no transoceanic flights in the Southern Hemisphere

This post contains references to products from one or more of our advertisers. We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. Terms apply to the offers listed on this page. For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page.

Look at this map of world air traffic, taken this week from flight-tracking site FlightRadar24.

While the skies over the North Atlantic and Pacific Oceans are buzzing with aircraft, and busy air corridors link Latin America, Australia and Africa to points north, the Southern Hemisphere is pretty much a desert. Almost nobody is seen flying between the Earth&rsquos southern continents.

But why is intercontinental air traffic within the Southern Hemisphere so thin?

First of all, the Southern Hemisphere accounts for a much smaller share of the Earth&rsquos landmass and population than the Northern one. And, historically, Latin America, Southern Africa and Australia and New Zealand have had closer cultural and political links with lands to the north than with places in the same hemisphere.

There are technical challenges too. It&rsquos true that today&rsquos long-haul jets can cross those vast oceans without refueling, but there&rsquos more to the story.

Take for example the reports, a couple of years ago, that Norwegian &mdash back then in the midst of an international expansion &mdash had been granted rights to fly nonstop between Buenos Aires and Perth, Western Australia, by way of the South Pole. It ended up not happening, not least because Norwegian has since scaled down its operations and divested from its Argentinian subsidiary.

The great circle distance between Buenos Aires and Perth is 7,800 miles. Long, but an easy hop for the Boeing 787-9, the longest-range aircraft in Norwegian&rsquos fleet, and way shorter than Perth to London, which Qantas flies regularly with the same airplane. The real challenge on the route, which would pass right over the South Pole, isn&rsquot the distance, but the lack of diversion airports. There&rsquos nowhere to go if the plane needs to divert &mdash for a medical emergency, say, or a technical issue.

Screenshot from gcmap.com

Antarctica is also functionally the same as the open ocean when it comes to a very important technical issue: something called ETOPS, or &ldquoExtended Range Twin-engine Operational Performance Standards.&rdquo Airplanes with two engines, i.e. most of them these days, must adhere to strict rules when flying over areas far away from potential diversion points, because they have just another engine to keep them in the air in the event that one fails. Crossing Antarctica on two engines under those rules is feasible, just barely, but there&rsquos still the issue of diversions. The continent has no airports where commercial jets can land.

Other flights across the Southern oceans aren&rsquot as challenging, but they are few and far between. Here&rsquos a list.



Comments:

  1. Zulutaxe

    What necessary words... super, an excellent phrase



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